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Edfu TempleThe Majesty of Egypt

With Professor Bob Brier, Egyptologist, and Art Historian Patricia Remler

November 1 - 14, 2014

Herodotus said it 2,500 years ago: "Egypt is the gift of the Nile" - and what a gift it is - a narrow strip of cultivatable land teased from barren expanse of desert that is home of one of the greatest civilizations the world has ever known. The Nile, from the Sudan to the Mediterranean, was the life-blood of this remarkable culture that flourished for over 3,000 years.

 

Far Horizons presents an extraordinary 14-day archaeological tour to Egypt that includes many highlights. We have made special arrangements to enter the Queen’s Chamber of the Great Pyramid, Nefertari’s Burial Chamber, and the Unas Temple at Sakkara — all closed to the public. We meet with the excavation director at Elephantine Island, and hear about the Kharga Oasis Project from the archaeologist working there. Hosted by the Director, we join working archaeologists for cocktails and a tour of the incredible library at the Chicago House, a major center for Egyptian Studies. Traveling from Cairo to Luxor to Aswan, we will travel in the footsteps of the pharaohs and marvel at the glory of these monuments that have withstood the passage of time.

 

Join us for the opportunity to go behind the scenes, and experience the Egypt that tourists rarely see.

 

"The entire trip was far beyond our expectations. We expected the best...so whatever you call better than the best describes our trip. This was the most enjoyable trip that we have ever made. We enjoy learning new things and every day on the Majesty of Egypt was full of wonderful new and exciting experiences and many things to be learned. I don't know how Far Horizons manages to make dreams come true but you have the magic. We would love to travel everywhere with Far Horizons!" - Peter and Alberta Chulick

 

Concerned about safety in Egypt? Please read what a recent Far Horizons traveler had to say.

 

Click here to request a Majesty of Egypt brochure

Other Bob Brier tours

Undiscovered Egypt with Bob Brier

Sudan with Bob Brier

Travels with Bob Brier

 

Tour Itinerary

(B) breakfast, (L) lunch, (D) dinnerHotel Marriott in Cairo

Day 1: Depart on our cultural tour on our overnight flight to Cairo.

Day 2: Upon arrival, transfer to the 5-star Cairo Marriott, built around a 19th century palace on an island in the Nile River, and our home for the next three nights.

Day 3: Begin our archaeological tour of the Pyramids at the Giza Plateau. The pyramid complex was the necropolis for the Old Kingdom royal families, and is dominated by the three magnificent pyramids. The Great Pyramid was built for Khufu (Cheops) in 2528 BC. His son Khafre (Chephren) created the second pyramid and the Great Sphinx and the valley temple next to it. The third and smallest of the pyramids was built for Khafre's son Menkaure (Mycerinus) and was once covered with costly pink Aswan granite. We continue on to the Solar Boat Museum that houses the 141-foot cedar boat meant to convey King Khufu to paradise. In the afternoon, we return to the Great Pyramid for private entry into the tombs, where Bob Brier will elaborate on the newest theory about how the pyramids were built from his recent book, The Secret of the Great Pyramid: How One Man's Obsession Led to the Solution of Ancient Egypt's Greatest Mystery. Gather this evening for our welcome dinner party in one of Cairo’s fine restaurants. If available, Dr. Salima Ikram of the American University in Cairo will meet the group to discuss her work on the North Kharga Oasis Project. (B/L/D)The Pyramids of Giza

Day 4: Drive along the picturesque Nile Canal to Dahshur to see the newly opened Red and Bent pyramids. Then on to Sakkara, site of the famous Step Pyramid of Djoser, forerunner of the great Giza pyramids. We also visit the brilliantly painted mastaba tombs of Meriruka, Ptah-hetep and Ti, portraying lively daily life scenes, and then descend into the pyramid of Unas, whose interior walls record the world's first religious texts. On our return to the hotel and time-permitting, we visit the ruins of Memphis, once the capital of all Egypt. Dinner is on our own this evening. (B/L)

Day 5: This morning will begin at the stupendous Egyptian Museum, housing the world's greatest collection of Pharaonic antiquities including the amazing treasures from King Tutankhamen's tomb. After lunch at the renowned Naguib Mahfouz restaurant, run by the Oberoi chain and named for the famous Nobel Prize-winning writer who used to dine here almost every day, we will walk through the famous Khan el-Khalili souk, or bazaar, largely unchanged since the 14th century. In the late afternoon, enjoy a short walking tour of Islamic Cairo and a visit to Sultan Hassan mosque. Tonight we fly to Luxor and transfer to the Al Moudira Hotel, our home for the next five nights. (B/L/D)

Luxor TempleDay 6: The celebrated Egyptian city of Thebes, modern Luxor, was described by Homer as “the city of a hundred gates” because so many of its temples had the monumental entrances favored by contemporary Greek architecture. Thebes was twice the capital of ancient Egypt. It was from Thebes that Ahmose restored the unity of Egypt and inaugurated the New Kingdom. Today’s tour visits spectacular Karnak and the Temple of Amun. Arguably the most remarkable religious complex ever built, it contains 250 acres of temples, chapels, obelisks, columns and statues built over a period of 2,000 years and incorporating the finest aspects of Egyptian art and architecture. As many as thirty pharaohs are believed to have contributed to this complex, enabling it to reach a size, complexity, and diversity rarely seen. After lunch, we visit the magnificent Temple of Luxor. This has always been a sacred site and was the power base of the living divine king and the foremost national shrine of the king’s cult. The temple’s southern end was the dwelling place of the holy of holies, the principal god, Amun. Continue on to the Luxor Museum, housing the remarkable artifacts found in nearby excavations. The Chicago House is the Oriental Institute headquarters in Egypt and a major center of Egyptological studies. Here, we join the Director and his staff as they host us for cocktails and a specially arrange private viewing of the library, among the finest in Egypt. (B/L/D)

Day 7: Begin today on Luxor’s west bank, the royal necropolis of the Kings on the west bank of the Nile. Beginning with the 18th Dynasty and ending with the 20th, the pharaohs of ancient Egypt abandoned the Memphis area and built their tombs in Thebes. Most of these tombs were cut into the limestone following a similar pattern – three corridors, an antechamber and a sunken sarcophagus chamber – and stunning decorations by the finest craftsmen cover many of the passages and chambers. Here we will visit one of the smallest tombs in the necropolis, the Tomb of Tutankhamun, undoubtedly the most famous of the Egyptian tombs because of the extraordinary discoveries made here in the early 20th century. At lunch, galabeya makers will come to take measurements and orders for the typical Egyptian robe for those who want to purchase one. Deir El Medina was the village home of the workmen who were responsible for the construction and embellishment of the royal tombs from the New Kingdom. The master masons, artists and sculptors who worked on the crypts were born, trained, lived, died, and buried here. Within two of their tombs, we gaze upon dazzling paintings that speak of the status of the individuals. Continue to the Ramesseum. Ramesses II built his fabulous mortuary temple on the site of Seti I's ruined temple, where he identified himself with the local form of the God, Amun. The main building, where the funerary cult of the king was celebrated, has pylons decorated with scenes from the Battle of Kadesh. These scenes show Ramesses fighting the Hittites in a heroic counterattack, standing in his chariot firing arrows with deadly precision. (B/L/D)

Day 8: Depart this morning to visit two very special sites: Abydos and The Temple of Dendera. Abydos, one of ancient Egypt’s most sacred ancient cities, was the cult center of Egypt’s most beloved hero and the central figure of the Osiris legend, and the lovely wall reliefs in the temples tell of this popular tale. There are many temples to Hathor, the cow-goddess who presided over love, music, dance and enjoyment, but the temple in Dendera is the best preserved. The building is richly decorated with 18 Hathor-headed columns supporting the roof of the hypostyle hall and a series of reliefs linking the traditions of Hathor with her husband, Horus. (B/L/D)

 

Day 9: Begin today on Luxor’s west bank in the Valley of Queens, the burial place of the royal wives, concubines and daughters of the pharaohs, and the princes who died at an early age. The most renowned of these tombs was that of the favorite wife of Ramses II. Normally closed to the public, we have special permission to enter the interior of the burial chamber of Nefertari's tomb, covered with scenes of exceptional quality and beauty. Ramesses III chose the sacred site of Medinet Habu to build his funeral temple. Surrounded by a fortified enclosure wall and covering more than twenty acres, the complex contains funerary chapels, shops, and the gigantic Great Temple with it intact pylon decorated with scenes of the king’s victories. Here, we join Dr. Ray Johnson for a private, behind the scenes tour of the building. And finally, see the Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, the female pharaoh, certainly the most beautiful architecture within the Valley of the Kings. The afternoon and dinner are on our own. (B/L)

 

 

 

‘There is not enough room to tell you how enlightening and visually stimulating the private tour of Nefertari’s Tomb was. – Nancy Sandbower, Majesty of Egypt participant

 

 

 

"Entering Queen Nefertari's tomb in the Valley of the Kings is my favorite Far Horizons memory. The tomb was, unsurprisingly, spectacularly beautiful. The colors and images are so alive it felt like that tomb had just been completed and was poised to receive her body. But what struck me was how intimate it felt (despite its size), and how privileged I was to stand in a place never meant to be seen by anyone but a handful of Egyptian royalty. And, of course, it was even more special that this tomb is closed to the public and once again beyond the reach of public scrutiny. Yep, that's my favorite Far Horizons memory..." - Tony Navarrete


Day 10: This morning we begin our drive to Aswan, stopping along the way to explore two remarkable Ptolemaic sites: The Temple of Horus, the falcon-headed god, at Edfu and the Temple of Kom Ombo, dedicated to the crocodile-god Sobek. The Temple of Horus is the best-preserved ancient temple in Egypt and the second largest after Karnak. Built from sandstone blocks, the huge Ptolemaic temple has a massive entrance pylon covered with traditional scenes of the king smiting his enemies before Horus. Kom Ombo is notable for its two sanctuaries. One is dedicated to the crocodile-god, Sobek, and the other to the falcon-god, Horus the Elder. There are clear depictions of ancient medical instruments on one wall. In ancient times, sacred crocodiles basked in the sun on the riverbank near here, and hundreds of mummified crocodiles were found in the vicinity. Upon arrival to Aswan, transfer to the Elephantine Island Movenpick Resort, our home for the next three nights. In the late afternoon we visit the nearby Nubian Museum, opened in 1997. The recipient of the Aga Khan award for its stunning architecture, this museum highlights Nubia, historically Egypt's gateway to the rest of Africa. Today, Nubia’s lands lie under Lake Nasser, submerged in 1971 when the Aswan High Dam was opened. (B/L/D)

Boat ride to Philae IslandDay 11: Our explorations today cover several interesting sites. The granite quarries of ancient Aswan lay beside the Nile, thus providing easy access to boats for transporting this prized building stone to sites downstream. A crack in the granite stopped the cutting of what would have been an enormous obelisk, now known as the Unfinished Obelisk. The island of Philae was the center of the cult of the goddess Isis and her connection with Osiris, Horus, and the Kingship during the Ptolemaic period of Egyptian History. For over 50 years the island and its monuments lay half-submerged in water built up by the Aswan Dam, until the UNESCO rescue operations completely dismantled and rebuilt the temples and moved them to the nearby island of Agilika. In the afternoon, board a private felucca further down the Nile along Elephantine Island, the largest of the Aswan area islands, and one of the most ancient sites in Egypt with artifacts dating to pre-dynastic periods. The island is a beautiful place to visit, with wonderful gardens and some truly noteworthy artifacts. It was considered to be home of the important Egyptian god, Khnum, and while the still visible structure dates back to the Queen Hatshepsut of the 18th Dynasty, there are references to an earlier temple to this god on the island as early as the 3rd Dynasty. View the Temple of Khnum, originally erected during the Old Kingdom, a Greco-Roman Necropolis and the Temple of Satet, built by Queen Hatshepsut. After visiting the two nearby museums we return to the hotel. (B/L/D)

Day 12: The day is free to relax at the hotel or join the optional excursion to Abu Simbel in the morning. Dinner is on our own. (B/L)

Abu Simbel Extension - Day 13

Early morning transfer to the airport for our flight to Abu Simbel. Upon arrival, continue to the two imposing and colossal rock-cut temples of Ramses II and his cherished wife Nefertari, which were saved in the late 1960s through a worldwide effort when UNESCO moved them to higher ground. Return to the airport in the afternoon for the flight back to Aswan.

Day 13: Transfer to the Aswan airport for the flight to Cairo. Elegantly landscaped on what was a 500-year-old garbage heap outside the main wall of the medieval quarter, Al Azhar Park is Cairo’s first large green space in more than a century. Our final lunch will be in the park’s Mamluk-style Citadel Restaurant, one of the world’s most atmospheric alfresco dining experiences with spectacular views. Return to the Cairo Marriott and overnight. The afternoon and dinner are on our own. (B/L)

Painted columns at Kom OmboDay 14: Transfer to airport to board our flight back to the USA. (B)

 

 

 

"Our time in Egypt itself, was truly special. We count ourselves among the lucky few who get to have a more meaningful scholarly, educational experience, as opposed to a strictly touristic/consumerist visit. All the arrangements – hotels, in-country travel, local guides, restaurants - could not have been better." - Sarah and Jean-Pierre Lafare

 

 

 

Tour Leaders - Egyptologist Bob Brier and Art Historian Patricia Remler

Professor Bob Brier received his Ph.D from the University of North Carolina. He is not only one of the nation’s leading Egyptologists, but a brilliant lecturer and storyteller. He is professor of philosophy at the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University and the author of several books including The Murder of Tutankhamen: A True Story (Berkley Books, 1998), The Daily Life of the Ancient Egyptians (Greenwood Press, 1999) and The Secret of the Great Pyramid: How One Man's Obsession Led to the Solution of Ancient Egypt's Greatest Mystery (Harper Collins, 2008). Professor Brier has served as director of the "Egyptology Today" program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and as host of the Learning Channel series, The Great Egyptians. A popular lecturer for The Great Courses, not for credit seminars for lifelong learners, he has twice been selected as a Fulbright Scholar, and has received Long Island University’s David Newton Award for Teaching Excellence in recognition of his achievements. He is a wonderful teacher with a special flair for evoking the distant past in ways that make it seem vividly present.

Patricia Remler is an author, photographer, and art historian. She was the Researcher for four important Learning Channel documentaries - the three-part Pyramids, Tombs, and Mummies, the six-part series The Great Egyptians, the one hour Napoleon's Obsession: The Quest for Egypt, and the three-part series Unwrapped, The Mysterious World of Mummies. She is the author of Egyptian Mythology A - Z.

 

Bob’s lecture course was my chief reason for booking the trip. The contributions he made lifted the trip from the exceptional to the extraordinary.” - Donna Hackler

 

“As I have told every single person who has inquired about the trip since our return, I cannot imagine going to Egypt without Bob Brier and Pat Remler. I know that it IS possible to go there without them, but Bob Brier’s lectures from the Teaching Company were what lead us to Far Horizons in the first place, and the combination of the presence of Bob Brier and Pat Remler truly made the trip into one that holds the title for me of The Trip of a Lifetime. Bob Brier is such a wonderful teacher, and his remarkable enthusiasm for these wonders that he has seen so many times really sets him apart from other scholars I’ve known. Before going on this trip, my expectations of Bob Brier were fairly high, and he managed to so far exceed what I had hoped for that I have become a true fan for life. I don’t expect this experience to be easily dislodged from the pedestal it sits on in my mind.” - Deborah L. Hackler

 

Tour Dates

November 1 - 14, 2014

Tour Cost

$11,995.00 (per person, double occupancy) includes round trip airfare from New York’s JFK to Cairo, Egypt and the Egyptian internal flights; all hotels; most meals (as listed in the itinerary); ground transportation; and entry fees.

Cost Does Not Include: A separate donation check for $150.00 to “The Epigraphic Survey”; passport or visa fees; airport taxes; beverages or food not included on regular menus; laundry; excess baggage charges; personal tips; alcoholic drinks; telephone, email, and fax charges; or other items of a personal nature.

Single Supplement: $1,395.00. Should a roommate be requested and one not be available, the single supplement will be charged.

Abu Simbel Extension: $545.00 per person, includes roundtrip airfare to Abu Simbel from Aswan; ground transportation; and entry fees.

Fuel Surcharges: Far Horizons must pass on price increases when additional fuel charges are levied.

Donation Checks: The cost of the trip does not include the separate donation check for $150.00 to "The Epigraphic Survey". As a tour company that benefits from the historical, cultural and natural riches of our destinations, we have a policy of donating to scholars, archaeological and cultural projects, and museums in each of our destinations. This has created a bond with the academic community that allows you to gain an 'insider's view' of the work being done in each country. Please see information on the University of Chicago's Epigraphic Survey website — http://oi.uchicago.edu/research/projects/epi/. Note that the donation is required as part of your registration for the trip and is non-refundable.

Registration

A deposit of $500.00 along with a separate check for $150.00 to “The Epigraphic Survey”, is required along with your registration form. Final payment is due 75 days before departure. Upon receipt of your deposit and completed registration form, you will be sent a reading list and a tour bulletin containing travel information. Prior to the trip, we will send links to various websites of pertinent interest to the trip. Click here to download our Registration Form.

Cancellations and Refunds

Cancellations received in writing at least 75 days before departure will receive a refund less a $250.00 administrative fee. Cancellations received less than 75 days before the departure date will not receive a refund. If for any reason you are unable to complete the trip, Far Horizons will not reimburse any fees. Registrants are strongly advised to buy travel insurance that includes trip cancellation.

Note About Itinerary Changes

Changes in our itinerary, accommodations, and transportation schedules may occur. A good book to read as well as a flexible attitude and a sense of humor are essential.

Air Ticketing

If you do not fly on the group flight, you are responsible for all flight arrangements and transportation (including airport transfers) to join the group. If Far Horizons must change the trip dates or cancel the trip for any reason, Far Horizons is not responsible for any air ticket you may have purchased.

Private Tours of Archaeological Sites & Opening of Tombs Closed to the Public

The private openings of tombs, tours of archaeological sites and talks by specialists are scheduled in advance and include a donation to each. Specialists working at these sites are excited about showing their work to interested enthusiasts. However, please be aware that there may be times when the director or a member of the staff may not be on-site when our groups arrive due to other commitments.

 

TOUR TO EGYPT IS LIMITED TO 18 PARTICIPANTS