Blog

New Discoveries at Pompeii

Archaeologists have found new graffiti that may end the debate about the exact date of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii in 79 AD. In one of his letters to the Roman historian Tacitus, Pliny the Younger documented the event twenty five years after it...

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New Discoveries in Turkey’s Göbekli Tepe

Built several millennia before Stonehenge or Egypt’s great pyramids, Göbekli Tepe is acclaimed as the world's oldest temple at around 12,000 years old. Listed as a UNESCO World heritage property in 2018, this stunning sanctuary complex in south-east Turkey overturns...

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What is an Egyptian Dahabiya?

Herodotus said it 2,500 years ago: "Egypt is the gift of the Nile" - and what a gift it is - a narrow strip of cultivatable land teased from barren expanse of desert that is home of one of the greatest civilizations the world has ever known. The Nile, from the Sudan...

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Cooperative Government and the Ancient Olmec

A strong centralized monarchy, evidenced by a single plaza, characterizes the Olmec sites of San Lorenzo and La Venta.  At Tres Zapotes, however, this form of government appears to have been adjusted in order to distribute power between several groups. Archaeologists...

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Sport and Politics in the Ancient Maya World

Drawing by Christophe Helmke Two carved stone panels discovered in 2015 by Christopher Andres of Michigan State University and his colleagues at the site of Tipan Chen Uitz in Belize depict ballplayers and are the first of their kind to be found in Belize. One of the...

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Discovery at Nim Li Punit in Belize

Photo by Professor Geoffrey Braswell A large carved jade pendant likely made for the Maya king Janaab’ Ohl K’inich has been found by Professor Geoffrey Braswell of University of California, San Diego and his team at the site of Nim Li Punit in Belize. Measuring 7.4...

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Traveling through Bulgaria

A post-trip interview with tour manager, Kelly Bryson How long was your trip to Bulgaria and where did you visit? The trip was just over two weeks long and we made a circuit of the entire country, including stops at Sofia, Ivanovo, Madara Rider, Varna, Nessebar, Stara...

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Traveling along the Silk Road through Western China

A post-trip interview with 2016 trip participant, Kip Lilly   How long was your trip to China and where did you visit? This trip was two and a half weeks long and went west from Xian following the original Silk/Tea/Jade road (Dunhuang, Turpan, Hotan, Kashgar,...

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Traveling through Ethiopia

A post-trip interview on Ethiopia with tour managers, Kelly Bryson and Heather Stoeckley How long was your trip to Ethiopia and where did you visit? The main tour – Addis Ababa, Axum, Lalibela, Gondar, Simien Mountains, Lake Tana - was 15 days plus a 2-day extension...

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Sicily: The Heart of the Mediterranean

By Heather Stoeckley “To have seen Italy without seeing Sicily is to not have seen Italy at all, for Sicily is the clue to everything.”  These words from the poet Johann Wolfgang Goethe (who traveled to Sicily 1786-1788) have been the playing in the back of head since...

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Unlocking the past in Mexico City

By Heather Stoeckley Mexico City is bursting with color!  From the purple-blooming Jacaranda trees that line Reforma Avenue, to the yellow and orange dome that tops Palacio de Bellas Artes, everywhere you turn you are acutely aware of how this place epitomizes sun and...

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Myanmar: Land of Golden Pagodas

By Heather Stoeckley If there is one word to describe my experiences in Myanmar, it would be shwe.  It means ‘golden’ in the Burmese language, and from the moment of arrival, it epitomizes everything one sees in this enchanting country. This word is frequently used in...

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Sri Lanka: Land of Serendipity

By David Eckel In 1754, the English essayist Horace Walpole coined the term “serendipity” to refer to “a happy and unexpected discovery.” The source for his new word was a Persian story about three princes from Serendip, an island in the Indian Ocean that was known to...

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Travel through India’s Gujarat and Rajasthan

Exploring traditions in Gujarat and Rajasthan By Jenny Rose   I often think of India as a kind of reverse prism of religious and social diversity, continuously absorbing a wide range of peoples and ideas as it radiates its own distinct culture. Far Horizon’s...

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What’s the Origin of Ireland’s Name?

"In Gaelic myth, Ériu, Banbha and Fódla were three goddesses who greeted the Milesians upon their arrival in Ireland, and who granted them custody of the island. Ériu is generally believed to have been the matron goddess of Ireland, a goddess of sovereignty, or simply...

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“The Snake Kingdom” of the Ancient Maya!

The Petex-Batún is the most inaccessible and rarely-visited region of Guatemala. Today it is lightly populated, and yet more than 1,500 years ago Maya rulers jockeyed for supremacy as they created immense cities here. During the 1990s mounting evidence indicated that...

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