Blog

Chili peppers probably spiced drinks in Mexico?

Flowering plants of the genus Capsicum are usually referred to as chili peppers. There are relatively few sites in Mesoamerica, Central America, and South America that contain remains of Capsicum, and therefore, we know little about how pre-Columbian people used chili...

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What exotic food was for dinner in Pompeii?

Recent discoveries have shown that the rich feasted on exotic animals while the poor were reduced to eating simple fare. In a two block area near the city's Porta Stabia gate, the archaeological team excavated some 20 shop fronts that would have served food and drink...

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Has the world’s first calendar been found?

Humans had a sophisticated calendric system thousands of years earlier than previously thought, according to new research. The discovery is based on a detailed analysis of data from an archaeological site at Crathes Castle (Aberdeenshire, Scotland) - a row of ancient...

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The Olmecs were long distance traders?

Within the great Olmec city of La Venta, which existed from around 1000 to 400 B.C., have been found many extraordinary offerings including one composed of 16 different figurines carved out of various stones, found in 1951 and now displayed in Mexico City’s National...

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Where did the Minoans come from?

The British archeologist Sir Arthur Evans in the early 1900′s named the Minoans after a legendary Greek king, Minos. Based on similarities between Minoan artifacts and those from Egypt and Libya, Evans proposed that the Minoan civilization founders migrated into the...

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How was ‘Maya Blue’ paint created?

Spanish researchers have detected the pigment dehydroindigo in Maya Blue, the extremely durable blue paint used by the Maya to decorate their walls, codices, and pottery. The pigment is formed when indigo oxidizes during heating. “Indigo is blue and dehydroindigo is...

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Has Alfred the Great been found?

It could be the year for discovering notorious monarchs. Just weeks after remains found under a car park were confirmed as Richard III, archaeologists now believe they may just have stumbled on Alfred the Great. During excavations in a churchyard in Winchester, named...

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Religion change on Easter Island?

Using digital imaging technology to record and analyze the carvings on the surface of the Hoa Hakananai’a statue from Easter Island, which is housed at the British Museum. The Island is home to around 1,000 statues, but this one is of particular interest because of...

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Where is the oldest sacred temple in the world?

During excavations at massive Gobekli Tepe in eastern Turkey, carved megaliths and pillars arranged in circles have been found. Each ring contains two large T-shaped pillars, some soaring to 16 feet, surrounded by somewhat smaller stones.  Several are intricately...

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New finds push back dates at Selinunte, Sicily

Archaeologists have discovered what may be among the oldest remains at the ancient site of Selinunte: an ancient temple. Inside, fragments have been found that help explain the site's significance: an offering to Demeter, the goddess of grain and agriculture; a small...

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A queen conquered the capital of Roman Britain?

Boudicca was married to Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni people of East Anglia. When the Romans conquered southern England in AD 43, they allowed the king to continue to rule. However, when Prasutagus died the Romans decided to rule the Iceni directly and confiscated...

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A positive aspect of global warning

A pre-Viking woolen tunic found beside a thawing glacier in south Norway shows how global warming is proving something of a boon for archaeology. The greenish-brown, loose-fitting outer clothing - suitable for a person up to about 5 feet 9 inches tall - was found...

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Were Maya female rulers warriors?

Cleopatra, Queen Elizabeth and other powerful royal women played pivotal roles in history. Now they have some New World company among the ancient Maya.  A royal tomb recently discovered in Guatemala appears to be that of Lady K'abel, ‘Holy Snake Lady’, and articles...

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Lost City Found in Cambodia by Far Horizons Study Leader

[iframe src="https://media.theage.com.au/action/externalEmbeddedPlayer?id=d-2o1z8" width="420" height="236" scrolling="no"] Using the latest remote-sensing technology (LIDAR), Dr. Damien Evans, director of the University of Sydney's archaeological research center in...

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The Picts didn’t disappear

A recently discovered DNA marker suggests that 10 per cent of Scottish men are directly descended from the Picts. Mystery has long surrounded the fate of the tribe of fierce enigmatic people who battled with Rome’s legions before seeming to disappear from history....

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Copper Age Queen?

The remains of a woman buried about 4,400 years ago have been found in England. Her necklace, adorned with five small, tubular sheet gold beads and beads made of lignite; fragments of amber buttons; and her bracelet of lignite beads suggest that she may have been from...

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1,000-Year-Old Minaret Destroyed

The minaret of Aleppo’s 11th century Great Mosque, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, has been destroyed by fighting between government troops and the Free Syrian Army. Both sides of the civil war claim that the other is responsible. Other parts of the mosque have been...

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Why did the desert city of Petra thrive?

Archaeological research suggests that extensive terrace farming and dam construction in the region north of the city began around the first century, 2,000 years ago, not during the Iron Age as had been previously hypothesized. This development led to an explosion of...

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Who were Tutankhamun’s parents?

Through DNA analysis it is now known that Pharaoh Akhenaten was father to Egypt’s most famous pharaoh, the boy king Tutankhamun, but his mother was Akhenaten’s sister, not Akhenaten’s favored wife, Nefertiti.  Travel with Far Horizons to Egypt!

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The Moai and I

By Heather Stoeckley, Tour Manager Easter Island is the epitome of an island paradise.  The varying hues of green lands and bright blue ocean waters, punctuated by dirt-red stone (red scoria, used for the moai topknots) make for a visual delight, almost like looking...

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What is the Perahera Festival?

Fire dancers, musicians, stilt walkers, and elephants covered with neon lights! As the August moon waxes in the Buddhist month of Esala, the most flamboyant of festivals takes over the medieval royal city of Kandy in Sri Lanka. The procession includes fire jugglers...

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Off the beaten path in Luxor

Today we awake with the sun, all of us eager to get as much site-seeing in as possible on this, our last day in Luxor.  The hazy dawn casts hues of purple, pink and orange on the sky now dotted with hot air balloons rising through the morning air, their passengers...

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Musings from our Vat Phou Excursion

By Heather Stoeckley Today we fly to Laos, leaving behind our thrilling week of explorations – quasi Indiana Jones style – through the various jungle temples at Angkor Wat.  Once arrived, we enjoy a serene meander down the Mekong River and eventually reach the ending...

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